Search Results for: mysql show locked rows

Table locks in SHOW INNODB STATUS

Quite frequently I see people confused what table locks reported by SHOW INNODB STATUS really mean. Check this out for example:

This output gives us an impression Innodb has taken table lock on test/t1 table and many people tend to think Innodb in fact in some circumstances would abandon its row level locking and […]

MySQL Slow query log in the table

As of MySQL 5.1 get MySQL slow query log logged in mysql.slow_log table instead of the file as you had in previous versions. We rarely would use this feature as it is incompatible with our slow query analyses patch and tools Fixing this is not trivial while staying 100% compatible to standard format as TIME […]

MySQL Query Cache

MySQL has a great feature called “Query Cache” which is quite helpful for MySQL Performance optimization tasks but there are number of things you need to know. First let me clarify what MySQL Query Cache is – I’ve seen number of people being confused, thinking MySQL Query Cache is the same as Oracle Query Cache […]

SHOW INNODB STATUS walk through

Many people asked me to publish a walk through SHOW INNODB STATUS output, showing what you can learn from SHOW INNODB STATUS output and how to use this info to improve MySQL Performance. To start with basics SHOW INNODB STATUS is command which prints out a lot of internal Innodb performance counters, statistics, information about […]

InnoDB locks and deadlocks with or without index for different isolation level

Recently, I was working on one of the issue related to locks and deadlocks with InnoDB tables and I found very interesting details about how InnoDB locks and deadlocks works with or without index for different Isolation levels. Here, I would like to describe a small test case about how SELECT ..FOR UPDATE (with and without limit) behave […]

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug. First […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

Do not trust vmstat IOwait numbers

I’ve been running a benchmark today on my old test box with conventional hard drives (no raid with BBU) and noticed something unusual in the CPU utilization statistics being reported. The benchmark was run like this:

Which means: create 64 threads and hammer the database with queries as quickly as possible. As the test […]

Measuring Max Replication Throughput on Percona XtraDB Cluster with wsrep_desync

Checking throughput with async MySQL replication Replication throughput is the measure of just how fast the slaves can apply replication (at least by my definition).  In MySQL async replication this is important to know because the single-threaded apply nature of async replication can be a write performance bottleneck.  In a production system, we can tell […]