Search Results for: mysql performance blog io

3 handy tools to remove problematic MySQL processes

DBAs often encounter situations where they need to kill queries to ensure there are no long-running queries on a MySQL server that would impact performance. Long-running queries can be the result of many factors. Fortunately, Percona Server contains some handy tools to remove problematic MySQL processes. I will highlight all of the tools via some […]

Is MySQL’s innodb_file_per_table slowing you down?

MySQL’s innodb_file_per_table is a wonderful thing – most of the time. Having every table use its own .ibd file allows you to easily reclaim space when dropping or truncating tables. But in some use cases, it may cause significant performance issues. Many of you in the audience are responsible for running automated tests on your […]

MySQL benchmarks on eXFlash DIMMs

In this blog post, we will discuss MySQL performance on eXFlash DIMMs. Earlier we measured the IO performance of these storage devices with sysbench fileio. Environment The benchmarking environment was the same as the one we did sysbench fileio in. CPU: 2x Intel Xeon E5-2690 (hyper threading enabled) FusionIO driver version: 3.2.6 build 1212 Operating […]

Using Percona Cloud Tools to solve real-world MySQL problems

For months when speaking with customers I have been positioning Percona Cloud Tools (PCT) as a valuable tool for the DBA/Developer/SysAdmin but only recently have I truly been able to harness the data and make a technical recommendation to a customer that I feel would have been very difficult to accomplish otherwise. Let me provide […]

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug. First […]

MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes

Over the past few months I’ve written a couple of posts about dangerous debt of InnoDB Transactional History and about the fact MVCC can be the cause of severe MySQL performance issues. In this post I will cover a related topic – InnoDB Transaction Isolation Modes, their relationship with MVCC (multi-version concurrency control) and how […]

Percona Live 2015 conference sessions announced!

Today we announced the full conference sessions schedule for April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015 and this year’s event, once again at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara and Santa Clara Convention Center, looks to be the biggest yet with networking and learning opportunities for MySQL professionals and enthusiasts at all levels. Conference sessions […]

Getting mutex information from MySQL’s performance_schema

We have been using SHOW ENGINE INNODB MUTEX command for years. It shows us mutex and rw-lock information that could be useful during service troubleshooting in case of performance problems. As Morgan Tocker announced in his blog post the command will be removed from MySQL 5.7 and we have to use performance_schema to get that […]

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

How small changes impact complex systems – MySQL example

If you’ve been studying complex systems you know what minor changes might cause consequences of much greater proportions, sometimes causing some effects that are not easily explained at first. I recently ran across a great illustration of such behavior while doing MySQL benchmarks which I thought would be interesting to share. I’m using a very […]