October 31, 2014

The new cool MySQL patch has landed! Check your queries performance!

Microslow patch is used by many DBAs and developers to accurately time their queries and to catch those which run less than a second as they can also be a performance killer for a busy application. Recently I have started the development of an updated version of the patch. The basic idea is the same […]

Why MySQL could be slow with large tables ?

If you’ve been reading enough database related forums, mailing lists or blogs you probably heard complains about MySQL being unable to handle more than 1.000.000 (or select any other number) rows by some of the users. On other hand it is well known with customers like Google, Yahoo, LiveJournal,Technocarati MySQL has installations with many billions […]

Innodb transaction history often hides dangerous ‘debt’

In many write-intensive workloads Innodb/XtraDB storage engines you may see hidden and dangerous “debt” being accumulated – unpurged transaction “history” which if not kept in check over time will cause serve performance regression or will take all free space and cause an outage. Let’s talk about where it comes from and what can you do […]

PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about. First, I would say main […]

Followup questions to ‘What’s new in Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6′ webinar

Thanks to all who attended my webinar yesterday.  The slides and recording are available on the webinar’s page.  I was a bit overwhelmed with the amount of questions that came in and I’ll try to answer them the best I can here. Q: Does Percona XtraDB Cluster support writing to multiple master? Yes, it does.  However, […]

Increasing slow query performance with the parallel query execution

MySQL and Scaling-up (using more powerful hardware) was always a hot topic. Originally MySQL did not scale well with multiple CPUs; there were times when InnoDB performed poorer with more  CPU cores than with less CPU cores. MySQL 5.6 can scale significantly better; however there is still 1 big limitation: 1 SQL query will eventually use only […]

Get Me Some Query Logs!

One of my favorite tools in the Percona Toolkit is pt-query-digest.  This tool is indispensable for identifying your top SQL queries, and analyzing which queries are accounting for your database load. But the report you get from pt-query-digest is only as good as the log of queries you give it as input.  You need a large […]

A case for MariaDB’s Hash Joins

MariaDB 5.3/5.5 has introduced a new join type “Hash Joins” which is an implementation of a Classic Block-based Hash Join Algorithm. In this post we will see what the Hash Join is, how it works and for what types of queries would it be the right choice. I will show the results of executing benchmarks […]

The case for getting rid of duplicate “sets”

The most useful feature of the relational database is that it allows us to easily process data in sets, which can be much faster than processing it serially. When the relational database was first implemented, write-ahead-logging and other technologies did not exist. This made it difficult to implement the database in a way that matched […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]