Search Results for: mysql create index timestamp

MySQL 5.6 Transportable Tablespaces best practices

In MySQL 5.6 Oracle introduced a Transportable Tablespace feature (copying tablespaces to another server) and Percona Server adopted it for partial backups which means you can now take individual database or table backups and your destination server can be a vanilla MySQL server. Moreover, since Percona Server 5.6, innodb_import_table_from_xtrabackup is obsolete as Percona Server also […]

How to deal with MySQL deadlocks

A deadlock in MySQL happens when two or more transactions mutually hold and request for locks, creating a cycle of dependencies. In a transaction system, deadlocks are a fact of life and not completely avoidable. InnoDB automatically detects transaction deadlocks, rollbacks a transaction immediately and returns an error. It uses a metric to pick the […]

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

Recovering temporal types in MySQL 5.6: TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME

MySQL 5.6 introduces a new feature – microseconds resolution in some temporal types. As of 5.6.4 TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME can have a fractional part. To create a field with subseconds you can specify precision in brackets: TIME(3), DATETIME(6) etc. Obviously, the new feature requires the format change. All three types may now have a […]

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?

Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes. While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a […]

Recovery after DROP & CREATE

In a very popular data loss scenario a table is dropped and empty one is created with the same name. This is because  mysqldump in many cases generates the “DROP TABLE” instruction before the “CREATE TABLE”:

If there were no subsequent CREATE TABLE the recovery would be trivial. Index_id of the PRIMARY index of […]