November 24, 2014

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]

Log rotate and the (deleted) MySQL log file mystery

Did your logging stop working after you set up logrotate? Then this post might be for you. Some time ago, Peter Boros wrote about Rotating MySQL Slow Logs safely, explaining the steps of a “best practice” log rotate/archive. This post will add more info about the topic. When running logrotate for MySQL (after proper setting […]

Reducer.sh – A powerful MySQL test-case simplification/reducer tool

Let me start by saying a big “thank you” to the staff at Oracle for deciding to open source reducer.sh. It’s a tool I developed whilst I was working for them several years ago. Its sole purpose is to do one thing – but do it good: test-case simplification. So, let’s say some customer just […]

mysqld_multi: How to run multiple instances of MySQL

The need to have multiple instances of MySQL (the well-known mysqld process) running in the same server concurrently in a transparent way, instead of having them executed in separate containers/virtual machines, is not very common. Yet from time to time the Percona Support team receives a request from a customer to assist in the configuration of […]

Q&A: Putting MySQL Fabric to use

Martin Arrieta and I gave an online presentation last week on “Putting MySQL Fabric To Use.” If you missed it, you can find a recording and the slides here, and the vagrant environment we used plus a transcript of the commands we ran here (be sure to check out the ‘sharding’ branch, as that’s what we used […]

What I learned while migrating a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS

Hi, I recently had the experience of assisting with a migration of a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS (Relational Database Service). Amazon RDS is a great platform for hosting your MySQL installation and offers the following list of pros and cons: You can scale your CPU, IOPS, and storage space separately by using Amazon […]

Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

Failover with the MySQL Utilities: Part 2 – mysqlfailover

In the previous post of this series we saw how you could use mysqlrpladmin to perform manual failover/switchover when GTID replication is enabled in MySQL 5.6. Now we will review mysqlfailover (version 1.4.3), another tool from the MySQL Utilities that can be used for automatic failover. Summary mysqlfailover can perform automatic failover if MySQL 5.6’s […]

How MySQL ‘queries’ and ‘questions’ are measured

MySQL has status variables “questions” and “queries” which are rather close but also a bit different, making it confusing for many people. The manual describing it might not be very easy to understand:

In a nutshell if you’re not using prepared statements the big difference between those is what “Questions” would count stored procedure calls as […]

Database auditing alternatives for MySQL

Database auditing is the monitoring of selected actions of database users. It doesn’t protect the database in case privileges are set incorrectly, but it can help the administrator detect mistakes. Audits are needed for security. You can track data access and be alerted to suspicious activity. Audits are required for data integrity. They are the […]