September 21, 2014

Lost innodb tables, xfs and binary grep

Before I start a story about the data recovery case I worked on yesterday, here’s a quick tip – having a database backup does not mean you can restore from it. Always verify your backup can be used to restore the database! If not automatically, do this manually, at least once a month. No, seriously […]

Looking at Redis

Recently I had a chance to take a look at Redis project, which is semi-persistent in memory database with idea somethat similar to memcache but richer feature set. Redis has simple single process event driven design, which means it does not have to deal with any locks which is performance killer for a lot of […]

Converting Character Sets

The web is going the way of utf8. Drizzle has chosen it as the default character set, most back-ends to websites use it to store text data, and those who are still using latin1 have begun to migrate their databases to utf8. Googling for “mysql convert charset to utf8″ results in a plethora of sites, […]

Poor man’s query logging

Occasionally there is a need to see what queries reach MySQL. The database provides several ways to share that information with you. One is called general log activated with

(or

in MySQL 5.1+) start-up parameter. The log writes any query being executed by MySQL to a file with limited amount of additional information. […]

How to track down the source of Aborted_connects

Yesterday I helped someone who was seeing a lot of “server has gone away” error messages on his website. While investigating this problem, I noticed several things amiss, which appeared to be related but really weren’t. The biggest measurable sign was

Picking datatype for STATUS fields

Quite commonly in the applications you would need to use some kind of “status” field – status of order – “new”, “confirmed”, “in production”, “shipped” status of job, message etc. People use variety of ways to handle them often without giving enough thought to the choice which can cause problems later. Perhaps worst, though quite […]

Data Recovery Toolkit for InnoDB Version 0.1 Released

As Peter mentioned in one of previous posts, we’ve done huge work developing robust strategies of InnoDB data recovery to provide our customers effective data recovery services and one of major parts of these strategies is our toolkit for InnoDB data recovery. Today I’m proud to announce its first public release which was used to […]

Be careful when joining on CONCAT

The other day I had a case with an awful performance of a rather simple join. It was a join on tb1.vid = CONCAT(‘prefix-‘, tb2.id) with tb1.vid – indexed varchar(100) and tb2.id – int(11) column. No matter what I did – forced it to use key, forced a different join order, it did not want […]

Redundant index is not always bad

About year ago Peter wrote about redundant indexes and mentioned sometimes it is good to leave two indexes, even one is first part of another. I’m speaking about BTREE indexes, for example, KEY (A), and KEY (A,B). From SQL point of view KEY(A) is not needed, as for queries like WHERE A=5 the index (A,B) […]

Sphinx: Going Beyond full text search

I’ve already wrote a few times about various projects using Sphinx with MySQL for scalable Full Text Search applications. For example on BoardReader we’re using this combination to build search against over 1 billion of forum posts totaling over 1.5TB of data handling hundreds of thousands of search queries per day. The count of forum […]