Search Results for: more memory performance

Impact of memory allocators on MySQL performance

MySQL server intensively uses dynamic memory allocation so a good choice of memory allocator is quite important for the proper utilization of CPU/RAM resources. Efficient memory allocator should help to improve scalability, increase throughput and keep memory footprint under the control. In this post I’m going to check impact of several memory allocators on the […]

Index Condition Pushdown in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5 and its performance impact

I have been working with Peter in preparation for the talk comparing the optimizer enhancements in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5. We are taking a look at and benchmarking optimizer enhancements one by one. So in the same way this blog post is aimed at a new optimizer enhancement Index Condition Pushdown (ICP). Its available […]

The two even more fundamental performance metrics

In a recent blog post, I wrote about four fundamental metrics for system performance analysis. These are throughput, residence time, “weighted time” (the sum of all residence times in the observation period — the terminology is mine for lack of a better name), and concurrency. I derived all of these metrics from two “even more […]

Drop table performance

There have been recent discussions about DROP TABLE performance in InnoDB. (You can refer to Peter’s post http://www.percona.com/blog/2011/02/03/performance-problem-with-innodb-and-drop-table/ and these bug reports: http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=51325 and http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=56332.) It may not sound that serious, but if your workload often uses DROP TABLE and you have a big buffer pool, it may be a significant issue. This can get […]

Performance or Stability ???

Sometimes the question is put like are you looking for Performance OR Stability, which I believe is a strange way to put it. In real life systems you care both about Performance AND Stability. I would even say Stability is a not the best world here, I would day you care about your minimal performance […]

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]