Search Results for: long primary key

To pack or not to pack – MyISAM Key compression

MyISAM storage engine has key compression which makes its indexes much smaller, allowing better fit in caches and so improving performance dramatically. Actually packed indexes not a bit longer rows is frequent reason of MyISAM performing better than Innodb. In this article I’ll get in a bit more details about packed keys and performance implications […]

My Innodb Feature wishes

At Users Conference Heikki did good presentation about Innodb planned features. I did not see some of big and tiny wishes listed so I was making notes. Here is what I’d like to see Packed indexes. In many cases then difference in Performace with MyISAM and Innodb is huge for read only workload it is […]

Multi-threaded replication with MySQL 5.6: Use GTIDs!

MySQL 5.6 allows you to execute replicated events in parallel as long as data is split across several databases. This feature is named “Multi-Threaded Slave” (MTS) and it is easy to enable by setting slave_parallel_workers to a > 1 value. However if you decide to use MTS without GTIDs, you may run into annoying issues. […]

InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL benchmarking: Know your baseline variance!

Often enough I find MySQL benchmark results where the difference between results is 1% or even less and some conclusions are drawn. Now it is not that 1% is not important – especially when you’re developing the product you should care about those 1% improvements or regressions because they tend to add up. However with […]