Search Results for: large primary key

InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight: Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows […]

Hijacking Innodb Foreign Keys

I guess I’m first to post in 2012 so Happy New Year all blog readers ! Now back to HardCore MySQL business – foreign Keys. MySQL supported Foreign Keys for Innodb for many years, yet rudimentary support initially added in MySQL 3.23.44 have not been improved in new releases as much as I’d like. We […]

Are larger buffers always better ?

Sometimes I see people thinking about buffers as “larger is always better” so if “large” MySQL sample configuration is designed for 2GB and they happen to have 16, they would simply multiply all/most values by 10 and hope it will work well. Obviously it does not. The least problem would be wasting memory, allocating a […]

To pack or not to pack – MyISAM Key compression

MyISAM storage engine has key compression which makes its indexes much smaller, allowing better fit in caches and so improving performance dramatically. Actually packed indexes not a bit longer rows is frequent reason of MyISAM performing better than Innodb. In this article I’ll get in a bit more details about packed keys and performance implications […]

Store UUID in an optimized way

A few years ago Peter Zaitsev, in a post titled “To UUID or not to UUID,” wrote: “There is timestamp based part in UUID which has similar properties to auto_increment and which could be used to have values generated at same point in time physically local in BTREE index.” For this post I’ve rearranged the timestamp part […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL benchmarking: Know your baseline variance!

Often enough I find MySQL benchmark results where the difference between results is 1% or even less and some conclusions are drawn. Now it is not that 1% is not important – especially when you’re developing the product you should care about those 1% improvements or regressions because they tend to add up. However with […]