Search Results for: join int

Join us for our first Percona MySQL University event in Raleigh, N.C. Jan 29

At Percona we focus on education a lot, which we believe is critical for us to be successful with our mission of making businesses successful with their use of MySQL. The MySQL Performance Blog, our first effort in this space, by now contains over 1,000 technical articles. We have spoken on countless conferences and Meetups […]

Introducing the “Version Check” Feature in Percona Toolkit

Recently there has been a storm of bugs and problems in all variants of MySQL including MySQL, Percona Server, and MariaDB. To list a few: MySQL 5.5.25 UPDATE on InnoDB table enters recursion, consumes all disk space All MariaDB and MySQL versions up to 5.1.61, 5.2.11, 5.3.5, 5.5.22 Security vulnerability in MySQL/MariaDB sql/password.c MySQL 5.1.61 […]

A case for MariaDB’s Hash Joins

MariaDB 5.3/5.5 has introduced a new join type “Hash Joins” which is an implementation of a Classic Block-based Hash Join Algorithm. In this post we will see what the Hash Join is, how it works and for what types of queries would it be the right choice. I will show the results of executing benchmarks […]

Join Optimizations in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5

This is the third blog post in the series of blog posts leading up to the talk comparing the optimizer enhancements in MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5. This blog post is targeted at the join related optimizations introduced in the optimizer. These optimizations are available in both MySQL 5.6 and MariaDB 5.5, and MariaDB 5.5 […]

Using Flexviews – part one, introduction to materialized views

If you know me, then you probably have heard of Flexviews. If not, then it might not be familiar to you. I’m giving a talk on it at the MySQL 2011 CE, and I figured I should blog about it before then. For those unfamiliar, Flexviews enables you to create and maintain incrementally refreshable materialized […]

How is join_buffer_size allocated?

When examining MySQL configuration, we quite often want to know how various buffer sizes are used. This matters because some buffers (sort_buffer_size for example) are allocated to their full size immediately as soon as they are needed, but others are effectively a “max size” and the corresponding buffers are allocated only as big as needed […]