Search Results for: innodb write performance

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write […]

Looking deeper into InnoDB’s problem with many row versions

A few days ago I wrote about MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes and I touched briefly upon the bizarre performance regression I found with InnoDB handling a large amount of versions for a single row. Today I wanted to look a bit deeper into the problem, which I also filed as a bug. First […]

MySQL performance implications of InnoDB isolation modes

Over the past few months I’ve written a couple of posts about dangerous debt of InnoDB Transactional History and about the fact MVCC can be the cause of severe MySQL performance issues. In this post I will cover a related topic – InnoDB Transaction Isolation Modes, their relationship with MVCC (multi-version concurrency control) and how […]

Getting mutex information from MySQL’s performance_schema

We have been using SHOW ENGINE INNODB MUTEX command for years. It shows us mutex and rw-lock information that could be useful during service troubleshooting in case of performance problems. As Morgan Tocker announced in his blog post the command will be removed from MySQL 5.7 and we have to use performance_schema to get that […]

InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]

Innodb transaction history often hides dangerous ‘debt’

In many write-intensive workloads Innodb/XtraDB storage engines you may see hidden and dangerous “debt” being accumulated – unpurged transaction “history” which if not kept in check over time will cause serve performance regression or will take all free space and cause an outage. Let’s talk about where it comes from and what can you do […]

Reference architecture for a write-intensive MySQL deployment

We designed Percona Cloud Tools (both hardware and software setup) to handle a very high-intensive MySQL write workload. For example, we already observe inserts of 1bln+ datapoints per day. So I wanted to share what kind of hardware we use to achieve this result. Let me describe what we use, and later I will explain […]

Using MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema in multi-tenant environments

Hosting a shared MySQL instance for your internal or external clients (“multi-tenant”) was always a challenge. Multi-tenants approach or a “schema-per-customer” approach is pretty common nowadays to host multiple clients on the same MySQL sever. One of issues of this approach, however, is the lack of visibility: it is hard to tell how many resources (queries, disk, […]