October 21, 2014

InnoDB file formats: Here is one pitfall to avoid

UPDATED: explaining the role of innodb_strict_mode and correcting introduction of innodb_file_format Compressed tables is an example of an InnoDB feature that became available with the Barracuda file format, introduced in the InnoDB plugin. They can bring significant gains in raw performance and scalability: given the data is stored in a compressed format the amount of […]

Real-Life Use Case for “Barracuda” InnoDB File Format

In one of his recent posts Vadim already gave some information about possible benefits from using new InnoDB file format but in this post I’d like to share some real-life example how compression in InnoDB plugin could be useful for large warehousing tasks.

Future InnoDB File Formats

Looking into InnoDB docs I found list of names of future InnoDB file formats: Antelope, Barracuda, Cheetah, Dragon, Elk, Fox, Gazelle, Hornet, Impala, Jaguar, Kangaroo, Leopard, Moose, Nautilus, Ocelot, Porpoise, Quail, Rabbit, Shark, Tiger, Urchin, Viper, Whale, X, Y and Zebra. Aren’t there animals starting on X and Y?

How to reclaim space in InnoDB when innodb_file_per_table is ON

When innodb_file_per_table is OFF and all data is going to be stored in ibdata files. If you drop some tables of delete some data then there is no any other way to reclaim that unused disk space except dump/reload method. When Innodb_file_per_table is ON, each table stores data and indexes in it’s own tablespace file. […]

Should MySQL update the default innodb_log_file_size?

Now that InnoDB is the default storage engine in MySQL, is it time to update the default configuration for the InnoDB log file size (innodb_log_file_size) setting? In general, there are two settings that simply can’t be left at their historical defaults for a production installation. MySQL 5.5 increased the default buffer pool size to something […]

How to change innodb_log_file_size safely

If you need to change MySQL’s innodb_log_file_size parameter (see How to calculate a good InnoDB log file size), you can’t just change the parameter in the my.cnf file and restart the server. If you do, InnoDB will refuse to start because the existing log files don’t match the configured size. You need to shut the […]

How long is recovery from 8G innodb_log_file

In my previous posts I highlighted that one of improvements in Percona Server is support of innodb_log_file_size > 4G. This test was done using Percona Server 5.5.7, but the same performance expected for InnoDB-plugin and MySQL 5.5.

Analyzing the distribution of InnoDB log file writes

I recently did a quick analysis of the distribution of writes to InnoDB’s log files. On a high-traffic commodity MySQL server running Percona XtraDB for a gaming workload (mostly inserts to the “moves” table), I used strace to gather statistics about how the log file writes are distributed in terms of write size. InnoDB writes […]

How innodb_open_files affects performance

Recently I looked at table_cache sizing which showed larger table cache does not always provides the best performance. So I decided to look at yet another similar variable – innodb_open_files which defines how many files Innodb will keep open while working in innodb_file_per_table mode. Unlike MyISAM Innodb does not have to keep open file descriptor […]

How to calculate a good InnoDB log file size

Peter wrote a post a while ago about choosing a good InnoDB log file size.  Not to pick on Peter, but the post actually kind of talks about a lot of things and then doesn’t tell you how to choose a good log file size!  So I thought I’d clarify it a little. The basic […]