November 23, 2014

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

InnoDB vs MyISAM vs Falcon benchmarks – part 1

Several days ago MySQL AB made new storage engine Falcon available for wide auditory. We cannot miss this event and executed several benchmarks to see how Falcon performs in comparison to InnoDB and MyISAM. The second goal of benchmark was a popular myth that MyISAM is faster than InnoDB in reads, as InnoDB is transactional, […]

MySQL/Innodb scalability tests after fix

This is not freshest news ever but I simply have not yet had a time to comment on it. I already wrote about interesting benchmarks Tweakers.net have done for MySQL and PostgreSQL with different CPUs. I was in contact with Tweakers.net team to see if they miss something obvious in MySQL settings as well as […]

Are PHP persistent connections evil ?

As you probably know PHP “mysql” extension supported persistent connections but they were disabled in new “mysqli” extension, which is probably one of the reasons some people delay migration to this extension. The reason behind using persistent connections is of course reducing number of connects which are rather expensive, even though they are much faster […]

Avoiding MySQL ALTER table downtime

MySQL table alterations can interrupt production traffic causing bad customer experience or in worst cases, loss of revenue. Not all DBAs, developers, syadmins know MySQL well enough to avoid this pitfall. DBAs usually encounter these kinds of production interruptions when working with upgrade scripts that touch both application and database or if an inexperienced admin/dev […]

High Availability with MySQL Fabric: Part II

This is the third post in our MySQL Fabric series. If you missed the previous two, we started with an overall introduction, and then a discussion of MySQL Fabric’s high-availability (HA) features. MySQL Fabric was RC when we started this series, but it went GA recently. You can read the press release here, and see this blog post from Oracle’s Mats […]

Introducing backup locks in Percona Server

TL;DR version: The backup locks feature introduced in Percona Server 5.6.16-64.0 is a lightweight alternative to FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK and can be used to take both physical and logical backups with less downtime on busy servers. To employ the feature with mysqldump, use mysqldump –lock-for-backup –single-transaction. The next release of Percona XtraBackup will […]

Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads. When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT […]

2 cases for MySQL server overload

Your MySQL server is overloaded. You see hundreds of running queries in the SHOW PROCESSLIST taking many seconds to run, or can’t connect at all because all connections slots are busy. If you have worked with MySQL long enough you surely have seen it, probably more than once. This is what I would call “MySQL […]

A closer look at Percona Server 5.6

Yesterday we announced the GA release of Percona Server 5.6, the latest release of our enhanced, drop-in replacement for MySQL. Percona Server 5.6 is the best free MySQL alternative for demanding applications. Our third major release, Percona Server 5.6 offers all the improvements found in MySQL 5.6 Community Edition plus scalability, availability, backup, and security […]