October 20, 2014

MySQL compression: Compressed and Uncompressed data size

MySQL has information_schema.tables that contain information such as “data_length” or “avg_row_length.” Documentation on this table however is quite poor, making an assumption that those fields are self explanatory – they are not when it comes to tables that employ compression. And this is where inconsistency is born. Lets take a look at the same table […]

Data compression in InnoDB for text and blob fields

Have you wanted to compress only certain types of columns in a table while leaving other columns uncompressed? While working on a customer case this week I saw an interesting problem where a table had many heavily utilized TEXT fields with some read queries exceeding 500MB (!!), and stored in a 100GB table. In this […]

Testing InnoDB “Barracuda” format with compression

New features of InnoDB – compression format and fast index creation sound so promising so I spent some time to research time and sizes on data we have on our production. The schema of one of shards is

MySQL Blob Compression performance benefits

When you’re storing text of significant size in the table it often makes sense to keep it compressed. Unfortunately MySQL does not provide compressed BLOB/TEXT columns (I would really love to have COMPRESSED attribute for the BLOB/TEXT columns which would make them transparently compressed) but you well can do it yourself by using COMPRESS/UNCOMPRESS functions […]

Large result sets vs. compression protocol

mysql_connect() function in PHP’s MySQL interface (which for reference maps to mysql_real_connect() function in MySQL C API) has a $client_flags parameter since PHP 4.3.0. This parameter is barely known and almost always overlooked but in some cases it could provide a nice boost to your application. There’s a number of different flags that can be […]

Redundant index is not always bad

About year ago Peter wrote about redundant indexes and mentioned sometimes it is good to leave two indexes, even one is first part of another. I’m speaking about BTREE indexes, for example, KEY (A), and KEY (A,B). From SQL point of view KEY(A) is not needed, as for queries like WHERE A=5 the index (A,B) […]

To pack or not to pack – MyISAM Key compression

MyISAM storage engine has key compression which makes its indexes much smaller, allowing better fit in caches and so improving performance dramatically. Actually packed indexes not a bit longer rows is frequent reason of MyISAM performing better than Innodb. In this article I’ll get in a bit more details about packed keys and performance implications […]

A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables

A recurring and very common customer issue seen here at the Percona Support team involves how to make the ibdata1 file “shrink” within MySQL. I can only imagine there’s a degree of regret by some of the InnoDB architects on their design decisions regarding disk-space management by the shared tablespace* because this has been a big […]

Getting to know TokuDB for MySQL

During last April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, TokuDB celebrated it’s first full-year as an open source storage engine. I still remember reading the official announcement and the expectations it created one year ago. The premises were very interesting as it had the potential of helping MySQL manage “big data” in a way InnoDB just […]

Using InfiniDB MySQL server with Hadoop cluster for data analytics

In my previous post about Hadoop and Impala I benchmarked performance of analytical queries in Impala. This time I’ve tried InfiniDB for Hadoop (open-source version) on the modern hardware with an 8-node Hadoop cluster. One of the main advantages (at least for me) of InifiniDB for Hadoop is that it stores the data inside the Hadoop cluster but uses the […]