November 28, 2014

Google Compute Engine adds Percona XtraDB Cluster to click-to-deploy process

I’m happy to announce that Google has added Click-to-deploy functionality for Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) on Google Cloud Compute nodes. This gives you the ability to rapidly spin up a cluster for experimentation, performance testing, or even production use on Google Compute Engine virtual machines. What is Percona XtraDB Cluster? Percona XtraDB Cluster is a […]

Avoiding MySQL ALTER table downtime

MySQL table alterations can interrupt production traffic causing bad customer experience or in worst cases, loss of revenue. Not all DBAs, developers, syadmins know MySQL well enough to avoid this pitfall. DBAs usually encounter these kinds of production interruptions when working with upgrade scripts that touch both application and database or if an inexperienced admin/dev […]

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]

Innodb transaction history often hides dangerous ‘debt’

In many write-intensive workloads Innodb/XtraDB storage engines you may see hidden and dangerous “debt” being accumulated – unpurged transaction “history” which if not kept in check over time will cause serve performance regression or will take all free space and cause an outage. Let’s talk about where it comes from and what can you do […]

MySQL & OpenStack: How to overcome issues as your dataset grows

MySQL is the database of choice for most OpenStack components (Ceilometer is a notable exception). If you start with a small deployment, it will probably run like a charm. But as soon as the dataset grows, you will suddenly face several challenges. We will write a series of blog posts explaining the issues you may […]

Examining the TokuDB MySQL storage engine file structure

As we know different storage engines in MySQL have different file structures. Every table in MySQL 5.6 must have a .frm file in the database directory matching the table name. But where the rest of the data resides depends on the storage engine. For MyISAM we have .MYI and .MYD files in the database directory […]

Semi-Sync replication performance in MySQL 5.7.4 DMR

I was interested to hear about semi-sync replication improvements in MySQL’s 5.7.4 DMR release and decided to check it out.  I previously blogged about poor semi-sync performance and was pretty disappointed from semi-sync’s performance across WAN distances back then, particularly with many client threads. The Test The basic environment of these tests was: AWS EC2 […]

OOM relation to vm.swappiness=0 in new kernel

I have recently been involved in diagnosing the reasons behind OOM invocation that would kill the MySQL server process. Of course these servers were primarily running MySQL. As such the MySQL server process was the one with the largest amount of memory allocated. But the strange thing was that in all the cases, there was […]

Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but […]

PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about. First, I would say main […]