Search Results for: how

Using MySQL Event Scheduler and how to prevent contention

MySQL introduced the Event Scheduler in version 5.1.6. The Event Scheduler is a MySQL-level “cron job”, which will run events inside MySQL. Up until now, this was not a very popular feature, however, it has gotten more popular since the adoption of Amazon RDS – as well as similar MySQL database as a service offerings […]

How to setup a PXC cluster with GTIDs (and have async slaves replicating from it!)

This past week was marked by a series of personal findings related to the use of Global Transaction IDs (GTIDs) on Galera-based clusters such as Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC). The main one being the fact that transactions touching MyISAM tables (and FLUSH PRIVILEGES!) issued on a giving node of the cluster are recorded on a GTID set […]

OpenStack Live 2015: FAQs on the who, what, where, when, why & how

This April 13-14 Percona is introducing an annual conference called OpenStack Live. I’ve seen a few questions about the new event so decided to help clarify what this show is about and who should attend. Unlike OpenStack Summits, held twice a year and dedicated to primarily to developers, OpenStack Live is an opportunity for OpenStack […]

Hyper-threading – how does it double CPU throughput?

The other day a customer asked me to do capacity planning for their web server farm. I was looking at the CPU graph for one of the web servers that had Hyper-threading switched ON and thought to myself: “This must be quite a misleading graph – it shows 30% CPU usage. It can’t really be […]

The MySQL Query Cache: How it works, plus workload impacts (good and bad)

Query caching is one of the prominent features in MySQL and a vital part of query optimization. It is important to know how it works as it has the potential to cause significant performance improvements – or a slowdown – of your workload. The MySQL query cache is a global one shared among the sessions. It caches […]

How small changes impact complex systems – MySQL example

If you’ve been studying complex systems you know what minor changes might cause consequences of much greater proportions, sometimes causing some effects that are not easily explained at first. I recently ran across a great illustration of such behavior while doing MySQL benchmarks which I thought would be interesting to share. I’m using a very […]

How well does your table fit in the InnoDB buffer pool in MySQL 5.6+?

Some time ago, Peter Zaitsev posted a blog titled “How well does your table fits in innodb buffer pool?” He used some special INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables developed for Percona Server 5.1 to report how much of each InnoDB table and index resides in your buffer pool. As Peter pointed out, you can use this view into […]

How a set of queries can be killed in MySQL using Percona Toolkit’s pt-kill

You might have encountered situations where you had to kill some specific select queries that were running for long periods and choking the database. This post will go into more detail with an example of report query offloading. Report query (select) offloading to a slave server is a common practice to reduce the workload of the […]

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]

How to deal with MySQL deadlocks

A deadlock in MySQL happens when two or more transactions mutually hold and request for locks, creating a cycle of dependencies. In a transaction system, deadlocks are a fact of life and not completely avoidable. InnoDB automatically detects transaction deadlocks, rollbacks a transaction immediately and returns an error. It uses a metric to pick the […]