October 21, 2014

pt-online-schema-change and binlog_format

Statement-based or row-based, or mixed?  We’ve all seen this discussed at length so I’m not trying to rehash tired arguments.  At a high level, the difference is simple: Statement based replication (SBR) replicates the SQL statements to the slave to be replayed Row based replication (RBR) replicates the actual rows changed to the slave to […]

Adaptive flushing in MySQL 5.6

As you may know, flushing in MySQL is an area of my interest, I wrote about it several times, i.e. http://www.percona.com/blog/2011/09/18/disaster-mysql-5-5-flushing/ http://www.percona.com/blog/2011/03/31/innodb-flushing-a-lot-of-memory-and-slow-disk/ http://www.percona.com/blog/2011/01/03/mysql-5-5-8-in-search-of-stability/ In MySQL 5.6 there was implemented a new flushing logic, so I decided to check what do we have now.

Disaster: MySQL 5.5 Flushing

We raised topic of problems with flushing in InnoDB several times, some links: InnoDB Flushing theory and solutions MySQL 5.5.8 in search of stability This was not often recurring problem so far, however in my recent experiments, I observe it in very simple sysbench workload on hardware which can be considered as typical nowadays.

Aligning IO on a hard disk RAID – the Benchmarks

In the first part of this article I have showed how I align IO, now I want to share results of the benchmark that I have been running to see how much benefit can we get from a proper IO alignment on a 4-disk RAID1+0 with 64k stripe element. I haven’t been running any benchmarks […]

InnoDB Flushing: Theory and solutions

I mentioned problems with InnoDB flushing in a previous post. Before getting to ideas on a solution, let’s define some terms and take a look into theory. The two most important parameters for InnoDB performance are innodb_buffer_pool_size and innodb_log_file_size. InnoDB works with data in memory, and all changes to data are performed in memory. In […]

InnoDB Flushing: a lot of memory and slow disk

You may have seen in the last couple of weekly news posts that Baron mentioned we are working on a new adaptive flushing algorithm in InnoDB. In fact, we already have three such algorithms in Percona Server (reflex, estimate, keep_average). Why do we need one more? Okay, first let me start by showing the current […]

Adjusting Innodb for Memory resident workload

As larger and larger amount of memory become common (512GB is something you can fit into relatively commodity server this day) many customers select to build their application so all or most of their database (frequently Innodb) fits into memory. If all tables fit in Innodb buffer pool the performance for reads will be quite […]

When is it a time to upgrade memory ?

Quite commonly I get a question similar to this – “My Innodb Buffer Pool is already 90% full, should I be thinking about upgrading memory already?” This is a wrong way to put the question. Unless you have very small database (read as database which is less than innodb_buffer_pool_size) You will have all buffer pool […]

Getting to know TokuDB for MySQL

During last April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, TokuDB celebrated it’s first full-year as an open source storage engine. I still remember reading the official announcement and the expectations it created one year ago. The premises were very interesting as it had the potential of helping MySQL manage “big data” in a way InnoDB just […]

ScaleArc: Benchmarking with sysbench

ScaleArc recently hired Percona to perform various tests on its database traffic management product. This post is the outcome of the benchmarks carried out by Uday Sawant (ScaleArc) and myself. You can also download the report directly as a PDF here. The goal of these benchmarks is to identify the potential overhead of the ScaleArc […]