October 25, 2014

MySQL on Amazon RDS part 1: insert performance

Amazon’s Relational Database Service (RDS) is a cloud-hosted MySQL solution. I’ve had some clients hitting performance limitations on standard EC2 servers with EBS volumes (see SSD versus EBS death match), and one of them wanted to evaluate RDS as a replacement. It is built on the same technologies, but the hardware and networking are supposed […]

SSD, XFS, LVM, fsync, write cache, barrier and lost transactions

We finally managed to get Intel X25-E SSD drive into our lab. I attached it to our Dell PowerEdge R900. The story making it running is worth separate mentioning – along with Intel X25-E I got HighPoint 2300 controller and CentOS 5.2 just could not start with two RAID controllers (Perc/6i and HighPoint 2300). The […]

Disaster: LVM Performance in Snapshot Mode

In many cases I speculate how things should work based on what they do and in number of cases this lead me forming too good impression about technology and when running in completely unanticipated bug or performance bottleneck. This is exactly the case with LVM Number of customers have reported the LVM gives very high […]

Evaluating IO subsystem performance for MySQL Needs

I’m often asked how one can evaluate IO subsystem (Hard drive RAID or SAN) performance for MySQL needs so I’ve decided to write some simple steps you can take to get a good feeling about it, it is not perfect but usually can tell you quite a lot of what you should expect from the […]

Can Innodb Read-Ahead reduce read performance ?

I ran into pretty interesting behavior today. We needed to dump and reload large database and we had pretty good IO subsystem so we started number of mysqldump processes in parallel. Unlike in other case when we did load in parallel, dump in parallel did not increase IO rate significantly and we could still see […]

MySQL 4 to MySQL 5 Upgrade performance regressions

This week I already had two serious performance regression cases when upgrading from MySQL 4.0 and 4.1 to MySQL 5.0. By serious I mean several times performance difference not just 5-10% you often see for simple queries due to generally fatter code. The problem in both cases was MySQL 5.0 broken group commit bug. First […]

Sysbench evaluation of iSCSI performance

Partha Dutta posted pretty interesting post about iSCSI vs SCSI performance using SysBench. This is nice to finally see some iSCSI benchmarks done with MySQL – something we were planning to do for a while but never ended up doing, mainly due to lack of hardware available for tests. It is also good to see […]

Group commit and real fsync

During the recent months I’ve seen few cases of customers upgrading to MySQL 5.0 and having serious performance slow downs, up to 10 times in certain cases. What was the most surprising for them is the problem was hardware and even OS specific – it could show up with one OS version but not in […]

Benchmarking IBM eXFlash™ DIMM with sysbench fileio

Diablo Technologies engaged Percona to benchmark IBM eXFlash™ DIMMs in various aspects. An eXFlash™ DIMM itself is quite an interesting piece of technology. In a nutshell, it’s flash storage, which you can put in the memory DIMM slots. Enabled by Diablo’s Memory Channel Storage™ technology, this practically means low latency and some unique performance characteristics. These […]

Percona Server with TokuDB (beta): Installation, configuration

My previous post was an introduction to the TokuDB storage engine and aimed at explaining the basics of its design and how it differentiates from InnoDB/XtraDB. This post is all about motivating you to give it a try and have a look for yourself. Percona Server is not officially supporting TokuDB as of today, though the […]