September 21, 2014

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write […]

Innodb redo log archiving

Percona Server 5.6.11-60.3 introduces a new “log archiving” feature. Percona XtraBackup 2.1.5 supports “apply archived logs.” What does it mean and how it can be used? Percona products propose three kinds of incremental backups. The first is full scan of data files and comparison the data with backup data to find some delta. This approach […]

How to move the InnoDB log sequence number (LSN) forward

This post focuses on the problem of the InnoDB log sequence number being in the future. Preface: What is an InnoDB log sequence number? The Log sequence number (LSN) is an important database parameter used by InnoDB in many places. The most important use is for crash recovery and buffer pool purge control. Internally, the InnoDB […]

MySQL and the SSB – Part 2 – MyISAM vs InnoDB low concurrency

This blog post is part two in what is now a continuing series on the Star Schema Benchmark. In my previous blog post I compared MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.6.10, both with default settings using only the InnoDB storage engine.  In my testing I discovered that innodb_old_blocks_time had an effect on performance of the benchmark.  There was […]

The relationship between Innodb Log checkpointing and dirty Buffer pool pages

This is a time-honored topic, and there’s no shortage of articles on the topic on this blog. I wanted to write a post trying to condense and clarify those posts, as it has taken me a while to really understand this relationship. Some basic facts Most of us know that writing into Innodb updates buffer […]

Optimizing InnoDB for creating 30,000 tables (and nothing else)

Once upon a time, it would have been considered madness to even attempt to create 30,000 tables in InnoDB. That time is now a memory. We have customers with a lot more tables than a mere 30,000. There have historically been no tests for anything near this many tables in the MySQL test suite. So, […]

Disaster: MySQL 5.5 Flushing

We raised topic of problems with flushing in InnoDB several times, some links: InnoDB Flushing theory and solutions MySQL 5.5.8 in search of stability This was not often recurring problem so far, however in my recent experiments, I observe it in very simple sysbench workload on hardware which can be considered as typical nowadays.

InnoDB Flushing: a lot of memory and slow disk

You may have seen in the last couple of weekly news posts that Baron mentioned we are working on a new adaptive flushing algorithm in InnoDB. In fact, we already have three such algorithms in Percona Server (reflex, estimate, keep_average). Why do we need one more? Okay, first let me start by showing the current […]

How InnoDB handles REDO logging

Xaprb (Baron) recently blogged about how InnoDB performs a checkpoint , I thought it might be useful to explain another important mechanism that affects both response time and throughput – The transaction log.

Different flavors of InnoDB flushing

In my recent benchmarks, such as this one about the Virident TachIon card, I used different values for innodb_buffer_pool_size, like 13GB, 52GB, and 144GB, for testing the tpcc-mysql database with size 100G. This was needed in order to test different memory/dataset size ratios. But why is it important, and how does it affect how InnoDB works […]