Search Results for: file system ext4 xfs innodb

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write […]

InnoDB performance optimization basics (redux)

I recently stumbled upon a post that Peter Zaitsev published back in 2007 titled “Innodb Performance Optimization Basics.” It’s a great post and reading it inspired me to examine what’s changed in the nearly six years that have followed in terms of MySQL, Percona Server – as well as in all of the other now-available […]

ext4 vs xfs on SSD

As ext4 is a standard de facto filesystem for many modern Linux system, I am getting a lot of question if this is good for SSD, or something else (i.e. xfs) should be used. Traditionally our recommendation is xfs, and it comes to known problem in ext3, where IO gets serialized per i_node in O_DIRECT […]

Linux performance tuning tips for MySQL

Because most MySQL production systems probably run on Linux, I’ve decided to place the most important Linux tuning tips that will help improve MySQL performance. There is nothing new here, most of them are well known, however, I’ve decided to collect those Linux configuration tips into 1 blog post. Filesystem ext4 (or xfs), mount with […]

Percona Server tree with support of Fusion-io atomic writes and DirectFS

Not so long ago Fusion-io announced an SDK which provides direct API access to Fusion ioMemory(tm) in addition to providing a native filesystem (directFS) with a goal to avoid overhead from kernel and regular Linux filesystems: ext4 and xfs. This requires a support from application, it should use special calls for IO. With help from […]

Aligning IO on a hard disk RAID – the Theory

Now that flash storage is becoming more popular, IO alignment question keeps popping up more often than it used to when all we had were rotating hard disk drives. I think the reason is very simple – when systems only had one bearing hard disk drive (HDD) as in RAID1 or one disk drive at […]