October 26, 2014

The small improvements of MySQL 5.6: Duplicate Index Detection

Here at the MySQL Performance Blog, we’ve been discussing the several new features that MySQL 5.6 brought: GTID-based replication, InnoDB Fulltext, Memcached integration, a more complete performance schema, online DDL and several other InnoDB and query optimizer improvements. However, I plan to focus on a series of posts on the small but handy improvements – […]

Find and remove duplicate indexes

Having duplicate keys in our schemas can hurt the performance of our database: They make the optimizer phase slower because MySQL needs to examine more query plans. The storage engine needs to maintain, calculate and update more index statistics DML and even read queries can be slower because MySQL needs update fetch more data to […]

Duplicate indexes and redundant indexes

About every second application I look at has some tables which have redundant or duplicate indexes so its the time to speak about these a bit. So what is duplicate index ? This is when table has multiple indexes defined on the same columns. Sometimes it is indexes with different names, sometimes it is different […]

Find unused indexes

I wrote one week ago about how to find duplicate indexes. This time we’ll learn how to find unused indexes to continue improving our schema and the overall performance. There are different possibilites and we’ll explore the two most common here. User Statistics from Percona Server and pt-index-usage. User Statistics User Statistics is an improvement […]

Improved InnoDB fast index creation

One of the serious limitations in the fast index creation feature introduced in the InnoDB plugin is that it only works when indexes are explicitly created using ALTER TABLE or CREATE INDEX. Peter has already blogged about it before, here I’ll just briefly reiterate other cases that might benefit from that feature: when ALTER TABLE […]

The case for getting rid of duplicate “sets”

The most useful feature of the relational database is that it allows us to easily process data in sets, which can be much faster than processing it serially. When the relational database was first implemented, write-ahead-logging and other technologies did not exist. This made it difficult to implement the database in a way that matched […]

Extending Index for Innodb tables can hurt performance in a surprising way

One schema optimization we often do is extending index when there are queries which can use more key part. Typically this is safe operation, unless index length increases dramatically queries which can use index can also use prefix of the new index are they ? It turns there are special cases when this is not […]

Should you name indexes while doing ALTER TABLE ?

MySQL Server does not require you to specify name of the index if you’re running ALTER TABLE statement – it is optional. Though what might be good practical reasons to specify the key name or omit ? Things what you should be looking at is how MySQL names indexes automatically as well as what maintaining […]

Redundant index is not always bad

About year ago Peter wrote about redundant indexes and mentioned sometimes it is good to leave two indexes, even one is first part of another. I’m speaking about BTREE indexes, for example, KEY (A), and KEY (A,B). From SQL point of view KEY(A) is not needed, as for queries like WHERE A=5 the index (A,B) […]

INSERT ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE and REPLACE INTO

Jonathan Haddad writes about REPLACE INTO and INSERT ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. Really, Why MySQL has both of these, especially both are non ANSI SQL extensions ? The story here seems to be the following – REPLACE INTO existed forever, at least since MySQL 3.22 and was a way to do replace faster and what […]