September 1, 2014

Getting MySQL Core file on Linux

Core file can be quite helpful to troubleshoot MySQL Crashes yet it is not always easy to get, especially with recent Linux distributions which have security features to prevent core files to be dumped by setuid processes (and MySQL Server is most commonly ran changing user from “root” to “mysql”). Before you embark on enabling […]

A case for MariaDB’s Hash Joins

MariaDB 5.3/5.5 has introduced a new join type “Hash Joins” which is an implementation of a Classic Block-based Hash Join Algorithm. In this post we will see what the Hash Join is, how it works and for what types of queries would it be the right choice. I will show the results of executing benchmarks […]

Impact of the number of idle connections in MySQL

Be careful with my findings, I appear to have compile in debug mode, I am redoing the benchmarks. Updated version here. I recently had to work with many customers having large number of connections opened in MySQL and although I told them this was not optimal, I had no solid arguments to present. More than […]

Big Iron for tests anyone ?

MySQL Users Conference is coming and with it my presentation about Innodb Scalability limits. We did bunch of tests but we surely could get benefit of some extra hardware for testing, so if you could provide us with dedicated remote access for benchmarks it would be great. Here is what we’re looking for in particular: […]

Innodb Performance Optimization Basics

Note: There is an updated post on this topic here. Interviewing people for our Job Openings I like to ask them a basic question – if you have a server with 16GB of RAM which will be dedicated for MySQL with large Innodb database using typical Web workload what settings you would adjust and interestingly […]

PBXT benchmarks

The PBXT Storage Engine (http://www.primebase.com/xt/) is getting stable and we decided to benchmark it in different workloads. This time I tested only READ queries, similar to ones in benchmark InnoDB vs MyISAM vs Falcon (http://www.percona.com/blog/2007/01/08/innodb-vs-myisam-vs-falcon-benchmarks-part-1) The difference is I used new sysbench with Lua scripting language, so all queries were scripted for sysbench.

InnoDB vs MyISAM vs Falcon benchmarks – part 1

Several days ago MySQL AB made new storage engine Falcon available for wide auditory. We cannot miss this event and executed several benchmarks to see how Falcon performs in comparison to InnoDB and MyISAM. The second goal of benchmark was a popular myth that MyISAM is faster than InnoDB in reads, as InnoDB is transactional, […]

InnoDB benchmarks

There was several changes in InnoDB to fix scalabilty problems, so I ran benchmark to check new results and also compare overall performance of InnoDB in 5.0 and 5.1 before and after fixes. Problems in InnoDB that were fixed: Thread trashing issues with count of theads 100+. In this case performance of InnoDB degraded dramatically. […]

FreeBSD tests

I’m continuing my experiments with different OS and today I tested FreeBSD 6.0 on my box. (more details about box and benchmark see here http://www.percona.com/blog/2006/06/13/quick-look-at-ubuntu-606/). Initially I was very pessimistic about FreeBSD, as results were (in transactions/sec, more is better. for comparison the results from Suse 10.0): InnoDB threads FreeBSD 6 Suse 10.0 Suse/ FreeBSD […]

MyISAM concurrent insert

Arjen posted a good note about MyISAM concurrent-insert features, though I should mention concurrent-insert can be cause of scalablity and peformance problems on SMP boxes, especially on queries processing range-queries. The reason of problems is POSIX read-write locks, which are used to protect key_buffer from concurrent changes and called for each processed row. More info […]