Search Results for: default innodb my.cnf

When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his […]

TokuDB vs InnoDB in timeseries INSERT benchmark

This post is a continuation of my research of TokuDB’s  storage engine to understand if it is suitable for timeseries workloads. While inserting LOAD DATA INFILE into an empty table shows great results for TokuDB, what’s more interesting is seeing some realistic workloads. So this time let’s take a look at the INSERT benchmark.

MySQL and the SSB – Part 2 – MyISAM vs InnoDB low concurrency

This blog post is part two in what is now a continuing series on the Star Schema Benchmark. In my previous blog post I compared MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.6.10, both with default settings using only the InnoDB storage engine.  In my testing I discovered that innodb_old_blocks_time had an effect on performance of the benchmark.  There was […]

InnoDB Full-text Search in MySQL 5.6 (part 1)

I’ve never been a very big fan of MyISAM; I would argue that in most situations, any possible advantages to using MyISAM are far outweighed by the potential disadvantages and the strengths of InnoDB. However, up until MySQL 5.6, MyISAM was the only storage engine with support for full-text search (FTS). And I’ve encountered many […]

Review of MySQL 5.6 Defaults Changes

James Day just posted the great summary of defaults changes in MySQL 5.6 compared to MySQL 5.5 In general there are a lot of good changes and many defaults are now computed instead of hardcoded. Though some of changes are rather puzzling for me. Lets go over them: back_log = 50 + ( max_connections / […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

A quest for the full InnoDB status

When running InnoDB you are able to dig into the engine internals, look at various gauges and counters, see past deadlocks and the list of all open transactions. This is in your reach with one simple command —

. On most occasions it works beautifully. The problems appear when you have a large spike in […]