November 23, 2014

Row-based replication, MySQL 5.6 upgrades and temporal data types

Whither your rollback plan? MySQL 5.6 upgrades are in full swing these days and knowing how to safely upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6 is important. When upgrading a replication environment, it’s important that you can build a migration plan that safely allows for your upgrade with minimal risk — rollback is often a very […]

Picking datatype for STATUS fields

Quite commonly in the applications you would need to use some kind of “status” field – status of order – “new”, “confirmed”, “in production”, “shipped” status of job, message etc. People use variety of ways to handle them often without giving enough thought to the choice which can cause problems later. Perhaps worst, though quite […]

Facebook MySQL database engineers ready for Percona Live London 2014

With 1.28 billion active users, Facebook MySQL database engineers are active and extremely valuable contributors to the global MySQL community. So naturally they are also active participants of Percona Live MySQL conferences! And next week’s Percona Live London 2014 (Nov. 3-4) is no exception. (Register now and use the promotional code “Facebook” to save £30!) […]

Rackspace doubling-down on open-source databases, Percona Server

Founded in 1998, Rackspace has evolved over the years to address the way customers are using data – and more specifically, databases. The San Antonio-based company is fueling the adoption of cloud computing among organizations large and small. Today Rackspace is doubling down on open source database technologies. Why? Because that’s where the industry is […]

MySQL compression: Compressed and Uncompressed data size

MySQL has information_schema.tables that contain information such as “data_length” or “avg_row_length.” Documentation on this table however is quite poor, making an assumption that those fields are self explanatory – they are not when it comes to tables that employ compression. And this is where inconsistency is born. Lets take a look at the same table […]

MySQL & OpenStack: How to overcome issues as your dataset grows

MySQL is the database of choice for most OpenStack components (Ceilometer is a notable exception). If you start with a small deployment, it will probably run like a charm. But as soon as the dataset grows, you will suddenly face several challenges. We will write a series of blog posts explaining the issues you may […]

How to scale big data applications using MySQL sharding frameworks

This Wednesday I’ll be discussing two common types of big data: machine-generated data and user-generated content. These types of big data are amenable to sharding, a commonly used technique for spreading data over more than one database server. I’ll be discussing this in-depth during a live webinar at 10 a.m. Pacific time on Sept. 24. […]

OpenStack’s Trove: The benefits of this database as a service (DBaaS)

In a previous post, my colleague Dimitri Vanoverbeke discussed at a high level the concepts of database as a service (DBaaS), OpenStack and OpenStack’s implementation of a DBaaS, Trove. Today I’d like to delve a bit further into Trove and discuss where it fits in, and who benefits. Just to recap, Trove is OpenStack’s implementation […]

Managing shards of MySQL databases with MySQL Fabric

This is the fourth post in our MySQL Fabric series. In case you’re joining us now, we started with an introductory post, and then discussed High Availability (HA) using MySQL Fabric here (Part 1) and here (Part 2). Today we will talk about how MySQL Fabric can help you scale out MySQL databases with sharding. Introduction At the […]

Sysbench Benchmarking of Tesora’s Database Virtualization Engine

Tesora, previously called Parelastic, asked Percona to do a sysbench benchmark evaluation of its Database Virtualization Engine on specific architectures on Amazon EC2. The focus of Tesora is to provide a scalable Database As A Service platform for OpenStack. The Database Virtualization Engine (DVE) plays a part in this as it aims at allowing databases […]