September 20, 2014

Should MySQL update the default innodb_log_file_size?

Now that InnoDB is the default storage engine in MySQL, is it time to update the default configuration for the InnoDB log file size (innodb_log_file_size) setting? In general, there are two settings that simply can’t be left at their historical defaults for a production installation. MySQL 5.5 increased the default buffer pool size to something […]

How to change innodb_log_file_size safely

If you need to change MySQL’s innodb_log_file_size parameter (see How to calculate a good InnoDB log file size), you can’t just change the parameter in the my.cnf file and restart the server. If you do, InnoDB will refuse to start because the existing log files don’t match the configured size. You need to shut the […]

How to calculate a good InnoDB log file size

Peter wrote a post a while ago about choosing a good InnoDB log file size.  Not to pick on Peter, but the post actually kind of talks about a lot of things and then doesn’t tell you how to choose a good log file size!  So I thought I’d clarify it a little. The basic […]

Measure the impact of MySQL configuration changes with Percona Cloud Tools

When you make a change to your MySQL configuration in production it would be great to know the impact (a “before and after” type of picture). Some changes are obvious. For many variables proper values can be determined beforehand, i.e. innodb_buffer_pool_size or innodb_log_file_size. However, there is 1 configuration variable which is much less obvious for many people […]

QA: Advanced Option Combinatorics (Pairwise Testing): Combinatorial mysqld Option Test Case Generation

How do we ensure that, when we have 35+ testable option combinations for mysqld, we test each and every combination of them? For example: will a different innodb_log_file_size combined with more innodb_log_files_in_group and a modified innodb_fast_shutdown setting truly not affect Percona’s log archiving feature? Most option-related bugs are caused by the setting of 1 or […]

InnoDB performance optimization basics (redux)

I recently stumbled upon a post that Peter Zaitsev published back in 2007 titled “Innodb Performance Optimization Basics.” It’s a great post and reading it inspired me to examine what’s changed in the nearly six years that have followed in terms of MySQL, Percona Server – as well as in all of the other now-available […]

MySQL 5.5.8 – in search of stability

A couple of days ago, Dimitri published a blog post, Analyzing Percona’s TPCC-like Workload on MySQL 5.5, which was  a response to my post, MySQL 5.5.8 and Percona Server: being adaptive. I will refer to Dimitri’s article as article [1]. As always, Dimitri has provided a very detailed and thoughtful article, and I strongly recommend reading if […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

Impact of logging on MySQL’s performance

Introduction When people think about Percona’s microslow patch immediately a question arises how much logging impacts on performance. When we do performance audit often we log every query to find not only slow queries. A query may take less than a second to execute, but a huge number of such queries may significantly load a […]

How Percona does a MySQL Performance Audit

Our customers or prospective customers often ask us how we do a performance audit (it’s our most popular service). I thought I should write a blog post that will both answer their question, so I can just reply “read all about it at this URL” and share our methodology with readers a little bit. This […]