September 30, 2014

Scaling: Consider both Size and Load

So lets imagine you have the server handling 100.000 user accounts. You can see the CPU,IO and Network usage is below 10% of capacity – does it mean you can count on server being able to handle 1.000.000 of accounts ? Not really, and there are few reasons why, I’ll name most important of them: […]

Performance Optimization and Six Sigma

You might be familiar with Six Sigma business management strategy which is employed by variety of the companies in relationship to managing quality of its product. Six Sigma applies to number of defects – when you have reached six sigma quality in your production you would see 99.99966% of the products manufactured with no defects, […]

Color code your performance numbers

When analyzing how good or bad response time is it is not handy to look at the averages, min or max times – something what is easily computed using built in aggregate functions. We most likely would like to see some percentile numbers – 95 percentile or 99 percentile. The problem is computing these in […]

Tuning InnoDB Concurrency Tickets

InnoDB has an oft-unused parameter innodb_concurrency_tickets that seems widely misunderstood. From the docs: “The number of threads that can enter InnoDB concurrently is determined by the innodb_thread_concurrency variable. A thread is placed in a queue when it tries to enter InnoDB if the number of threads has already reached the concurrency limit. When a thread […]

Beyond great cache hit ratio

I worked with application recently which has great memcached hit ratio – over 99% but yet still has average page response time over 500ms. Reason ? There are hundreds memcached gets and even though they have some 0.4ms response time they add up to add hundreds of ms to the total response time.

Why you should ignore MySQL’s key cache hit ratio

I have not caused a fist fight in a while, so it’s time to take off the gloves. I claim that somewhere around of 99% of advice about tuning MySQL’s key cache hit ratio is wrong, even when you hear it from experts. There are two major problems with the key buffer hit ratio, and […]

Tokyo Tyrant – The Extras Part II : The Performance Wall

Continuing my look at Tokyo Tyrant/Cabinet and addressing some of the concerns I have seen people have brought up this is post #2. #2.  As your data grows does  Tokyo Cabinet slow down? Yes your performance can degrade. One obvious performance decrease with a larger dataset  is you start to increase the likelihood that your […]

Finding your MySQL High-Availability solution – The questions

After having reviewed the definition my the previous post (The definitions), the next step is to respond to some questions. Do you need MySQL High-Availability? That question is quite obvious but some times, it is skipped. It can also be formulated “What is the downtime cost of the service?”. In the cost, you need to […]

Finding your MySQL High-Availability solution – The definitions

As my first contribution to the MySQL Performance Blog, I joined Percona at the beginning September, I chose to cover the various high-availability (HA) options available for MySQL.  I have done dozen of MySQL HA related engagements while working for Sun/MySQL over the last couple of years using Heartbeat, DRBD and NDB cluster and I’ll […]

NILFS – may be not yet

Inspired by NILFS: A File System to Make SSDs Scream and some customers asked if they should try NILFS on their SSD disks I decided to run quick tests to see how it performs. Installation on our Ubuntu 8.10 with SSD disk (Intel X25-E, 32GB) was pretty plain and I got partition with NILFS without […]