Search Results for: 5.4 performance

5.4 in-memory tpcc-like load

As continue to my benchmarks http://www.percona.com/blog/2009/04/30/looking-on-54-io-bound-benchmarks/ on 5.4 I tried in-memory load (basically changed buffer pool from 3GB to 15GB, and database size is 10GB). The results are on the same spreadsheet http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=rYZB2dd2j1pQsvWs2kFvTsg&hl=en#, page CPUBound. I especially made short warmup (120 sec) and long run (2700sec) to see how different versions go through warmup stage. […]

Looking on 5.4 – IO bound benchmarks

With a lot of talks around 5.4 I decided to check how it works in our benchmarks. For first shoot I took tpcc-like IO-bound benchmark (100W, ~10GB of data, 3GB buffer_pool) and tested it on our Dell PowerEdge R900 box (16 cores, 32GB of RAM, RAID 10 on 8 SAS 2.5″ 15K RPM disks). For […]

InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider. InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage […]

MySQL’s INNODB_METRICS table: How much is the overhead?

Starting with MySQL 5.6 there is an INNODB_METRICS table available in INFORMATION_SCHEMA which contains some additional information than provided in the SHOW GLOBAL STATUS output – yet might be more lightweight than PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA. Too bad INNODB_METRICS was designed during the Oracle-Sun split under MySQL leadership and so it covers only InnoDB counters. I think this […]

MySQL 101: Monitor Disk I/O with pt-diskstats

Here on the Percona Support team we often ask customers to retrieve disk stats to monitor disk IO and to measure block devices iops and latency. There are a number of tools available to monitor IO on Linux. iostat is one of the popular tools and Percona Toolkit, which is free, contains the pt-diskstats tool […]

Why %util number from iostat is meaningless for MySQL capacity planning

Earlier this month I wrote about vmstat iowait cpu numbers and some of the comments I got were advertising the use of util% as reported by the iostat tool instead. I find this number even more useless for MySQL performance tuning and capacity planning. Now let me start by saying this is a really tricky and deceptive number. Many […]

10 years of MySQL User Conferences

In preparing for this month’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, I’ve been reminiscing about the annual MySQL User Conference’s history – the 9 times it previously took place in its various reincarnations – and there are a lot of good things, fun things to remember. 2003 was the year that marked the first MySQL user conference […]

A case for MariaDB’s Hash Joins

MariaDB 5.3/5.5 has introduced a new join type “Hash Joins” which is an implementation of a Classic Block-based Hash Join Algorithm. In this post we will see what the Hash Join is, how it works and for what types of queries would it be the right choice. I will show the results of executing benchmarks […]