]]>
]]>

Latest MySQL Performance Blog posts

You are here

Subscribe to Latest MySQL Performance Blog posts feed
Percona's MySQL & InnoDB performance and scalability blog
Updated: 44 min 22 sec ago

Measure the impact of MySQL configuration changes with Percona Cloud Tools

June 11, 2014 - 12:00am

When you make a change to your MySQL configuration in production it would be great to know the impact (a “before and after” type of picture). Some changes are obvious. For many variables proper values can be determined beforehand, i.e. innodb_buffer_pool_size or innodb_log_file_size. However, there is 1 configuration variable which is much less obvious for many people working with MySQL: query_cache.

The idea of query cache is great, however, there are a lot of issues with MySQL query cache, one of the most important issues is query cache mutex which can cause a severe contention on the CPU bound workloads. In MySQL 5.6 you can remove the mutex by disabling the query cache completely (set query_cache_type=0).

There is a big issue with disabling query_cache though and it is not a technical issue. The issue is how do you convince your boss or dev team/operations team that query cache is bad. Almost all measurements available in MySQL will tell you that the query cache is utilized: there will be a good number of Qcache_hits. On the other hand you may see the contention in processlist: for example you can see one of those states associates with query cache contention:  Waiting for query cache lock or Waiting on query cache mutex (if you are running Percona Server).

Now you use Percona Cloud Tools (with Percona Server) to actually see how query cache is used globally and on per query basis.

Query cache visualization

Percona Server has this very useful additional feature: if you set log_slow_verbosity”  option to “microtime, query_plan, innodb” it will also log the information if the query was a query cache hit or query cache miss. This can give you a valuable inside for the query cache real utilization.

Percona Cloud Tools will be really helpful here as it will visualize this information and will actually see “before and after” graph. (It will set “log_slow_verbosity” option to “microtime, query_plan, innodb” for you if you set Slow log verbosity = Full in the agent configuration options).

Here is the example. I’ve disabled the query cache and then looked at the total query and lock time.

As we can see the total query time (across all queries) decreased significantly. The Average QPS on this picture is actually a little bit misleading and should be named “Queries running at the same time” (it is calculated as query count / time). The above graphs shows clear contention on the query cache level.

Just to confirm, we can look at the number of query cache hits:

The number of Query Cache “hits” dropped to 0 when we disabled the query cache.

Please note: if your workload is readonly and you are running the same complex query over and over again, query cache may be helpful. Usually, in normal circumstances however, the query cache can cause contention and reduce the response time (as you can see above).

Percona Cloud Tools is a free beta, please give it a try and share your experience in the comments. If you want to learn more about it, join the June 25 webinar hosted by Vadim Tkachenko titled, “Monitoring All (Yes, All!) MySQL Metrics with Percona Cloud Tools.” The webinar, which starts at 10 a.m. Pacific time, is free but I recommend registering now to reserve your spot.

 

The post Measure the impact of MySQL configuration changes with Percona Cloud Tools appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Pages

Contact Us 24 Hours A Day
Support Contact us 24×7
Emergency? Contact us for help now!
Sales North America (888) 316-9775 or
(208) 473-2904
Sales
Europe
+44-208-133-0309 (UK)
0-800-051-8984 (UK Toll Free)
0-800-181-0665 (GER Toll Free)
More Numbers
Training (855) 55TRAIN or
(925) 271-5054

 

Share This
]]>